Tips for Parents to Encourage Reading at Home

 

  • Read aloud to your child.  Set aside a regular time for reading with your family.  Take turns reading the book: you read a page, have your child read a page.

 

  • Make a time and a  place for reading in your home.

 

  • Encourage talking about reading and books with your family.

 

  • Set a good example – read in front of your children – MODEL

 

  • Keep books, magazines, and newspapers in your home to give your child constant exposure to reading material.

 

  • Keep a “library” or bookcase of books in your child’s room to teach him or her that books are an important part of your home.

 

  • Start sharing books when your child is born – and don’t forget to keep reading to your children into their teens.

 

  • Take advantage of “waiting” time to share books: on trips, at the doctor’s office, in line at the grocery store, etc.

 

  • Give books as presents.

 

  • Go on a “field trip” to the local library or bookstore.  Encourage your child to get his or her own library card.

 

  • Rent audio books from the library for long car trips.

 

  • Encourage older children to read to younger brothers and sisters.

 

  • Play games that are reading and writing related: Scrabble, Boggle, etc.

 

  • Offer special incentives to encourage your child to read: allow them to stay up 15 minutes extra to finish the chapter, take them to see a movie after he or she has finished the book on which it was based.

 

  • Limit television watching – plan a “No TV Night”.  Think of other activities that can be done as a family without turning on the television.

 

  • “Read Around the House” - cereal boxes, recipes, and television guides are a few examples of print materials that you can help your child read.

 

  • “Read Around Town” – Involve your child in reading street signs, restaurant and store signs

 

  • Write your own reading material for your child to read: notes in lunchboxes, lists of chores to be done, etc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tips For Parents to Encourage Writing at Home

 

  • Coach – don’t write for your child.  Question, listen, and talk about their writing together. 

 

  • Always look first for what is done well in the writing and offer lots of praise.  Children need lots of encouragement to be successful.

 

  • When working with your student writer, focus on ideas and content first.  Save editing until all the ideas are clear, complete and focused.

 

  • Listen attentively as your children read their writing to you.  Be eager to hear more and enthusiastic about their efforts.

 

  • Encourage even the youngest writers to “read” their writing aloud whether it is scribbles, drawings, or strings of letters.  Talk together about the story.

 

  • Read aloud to your child.  Discuss good examples of writing which might include newspaper or magazine articles, poetry, descriptions from travel brochures, etc.

 

  • Share your own writing with you child.  Ask for feedback on your piece.  Model what writers do. 

 

  • READ, READ, READ!  Better readers always make better writers.

 

  • Provide writing materials of all kinds, colors, textures, and sizes. 

 

  • Encourage letter writing to relatives, sports figures, celebrities, businesses, etc.

 

  • Encourage writing and addressing of greeting cards, invitations and thank-you notes.

 

  • Have your child help writing grocery lists, to-do lists and phone messages. 

 

  • Work with your child to keep a writer’s notebook, a place to record observations, quotes, favorite words, and future writing ideas.

 

  • Encourage your child to keep a journal and/or diary.

 

 

 

Lists complied from information by the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, The International Reading Association and Reading is Fundamental.